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Cops and Courts

Police still seeking Elyria man who left hospital

  • Beane-jpg

    Robert Beane IIi

    PHOTO PROVIDED

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ELYRIA — An Elyria man is still on the loose after walking away from a hospital while on medical furlough from Lorain County Jail.

Robert Beane III, 27, of Broad Street, was arrested July 2 on a secret indictment of kidnapping, aggravated robbery, felonious assault, having weapons while under disability and theft. Many of the counts also contained firearms and repeat violent offender specifications.

Three days later, after being arraigned on the charges, Beane was granted a medical furlough by Lorain County Common Pleas Court Judge Raymond Ewers, who is the judge assigned to all of Beane’s cases.

“He was here (at Lorain County Jail), and he was transported out for a medical condition,” Lt. Daniel Ashdown, with the Lorain County Sheriff’s Office, said. “Depending on the severity of the medical condition, they are given a medical furlough, which basically means they agree that once they’re done at the hospital, they’ll return. Sometimes, if we’re lucky, the hospital will actually call us and say he’s being ready to be released and tell us to come pick him back up.

“(Beane) chose not to come back. He didn’t even complete treatment.”

Ewers issued a warrant for Beane’s arrest, but police have not located him.

“He’s is still out with warrants issued,” Ashdown said. “As soon as he walked away from the hospital, we gave it back to our partners with the task force, and they put it back on the billboard and all that. They made him a priority.”

Beane has multiple pending cases in Lorain County Common Pleas Court, and bond was reinstated in those charges.

Ashdown said it’s not unheard of for a judge to grant a medical furlough in a situation like Beane’s. He also said judges take several factors into account when making such a decision.

“What’s probably getting missed in the conversation with anybody is yes, he’s got some serious charges pending against him, but he had bonds in place for everything he was being held on. There was nothing that was a ‘no bond.’ It was quite conceivable that someone would have posted bond for him and he would have been released anyway.

“It’s looks like he had a $200,000 bond, which isn’t insignificant, but that’s not out of the realm of possibility he could have posted that.”

Contact Scott Mahoney at 440-329-7146 or smahoney@chroniclet.com. Follow him on Twitter @SMahoneyCT.


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