Sunday, July 22, 2018 Elyria 66°
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Three overdose deaths reported in county on Monday

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Three people in the county died from drug overdoses Monday, which Lorain County Coroner Dr. Stephen Evans said is in line with the trend so far this year.

Evans said he’s seen a “big spike” in overdose deaths in January and February, with about four people dying every week from drugs. Last year, about three people died every week from a drug overdose.

On Monday, two overdose deaths happened in Lorain and one in LaGrange Township. Evans said the deaths were two men in their 40s and one woman in her 20s.

“In today’s world, it’s not unusual,” Evans said of the deaths.

Evans said the three drugs responsible for the most deaths are heroin, cocaine and fentanyl.

He explained that different versions of fentanyl exist, called fentanyl analogues, and many buying drugs don’t know about their effects.

“These toxic drugs are being mixed with heroin,” Evans said.

Three deaths from suspected drug overdoses in one day is nothing new.

So much so, that it does not raise alarms in law enforcement. It just alerts them to a possible new batch of “bad drugs” in the community.

“It will only be a matter of time before we see our next death, if we haven’t already,” said Elyria police Capt. Chris Costantino.

That’s because for those who shot up, snort or smoke drugs, the hope is always to score the strongest stuff.

“It’s a better high they are chasing,” Costantino said. “And, it’s not just heroin any more. A lot of what we are seeing is straight fentanyl.”

Death didn’t knock on Elyria’s door this weekend, but it came close.

Two brothers overdosed on Brunswick Drive, but survived. Another woman at a local hotel went to the hospital. It is not known at this time if it was for an overdose or medical emergency. She is known to experience both, Costantino said.

“It’s hard to tell what it us when we get there sometimes or even what they took,” he said. “We try to nail that down as quickly as possible, but we really need samples to be tested to do that. That’s why we tell people if they have loved ones on this stuff to turn the drugs over to police so we can get a better idea of what’s on the streets before people die.”

Police departments were not able to immediately provide more information about the deaths because of Presidents Day.

Contact Jodi Weinberger at 329-7245 or jweinberger@chroniclet.com. Follow her on Twitter @Jodi_Weinberger.



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